THE MOTOR-SURFER

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Documenting life during the first attempt at restoring a vintage motorcycle.

Similar to the zen -like feeling that is realized through surfing,
motorcycle repair can elevate the mind to a meditative state that eludes time and space...
Meaning I obsess over it, get frustrated, yell, laugh at myself and overall waste a lot of time.

Monday

Pieces-of-the-Pie - Some Major Progress

Finally, some progress has been made in the rebuild of this 1974 90cc little monster that I have learned to love and hate equally, dubiously named Betty. Well actually my mustachioed mechanical partner (yes, it's still illegal in California to marry another mechanic) Daniel Galligani, who actaully has an amazing blog of his own (more of that later), named her Betty the night they first met. I believe the name is quite befitting. The entire bike was painted jet-black, except for the bright red front wheel... Evokes an image of Bettie Page in black leather with red lipstick.

OK, so I finally got the motor apart, gear-change shaft and kick-start shaft have been replaced, along with the rotor bearings, crank-seals and 2nd gear. The inside was surprisingly clean and despite what the motor looked on the outside, there was actually little wear! Imagine my surprise when I didn't discover an awful mess of broken, spray painted, worn out pieces and a colony of elves living inside. So, once I get the gaskets in place and seal it all up, there are just a few (actually a lot) of things to finish up before she is ready for the open road...

Here is a quick recap of what I have left. Hopefully I'll have it done just in time for Christmas. Yeah, yeah, I know that's a long time, but I honestly spend about 20 minutes a week at most on this thing, if that.
  • Sand and finish the gas tank
  • Repaint both side covers
  • Paint the fork tubes
  • Sand off the rust from all 4 turn signals
  • Sand and repaint the frame
  • Clean up the wheels
  • Mount forks, shocks, fenders, tires and seat
  • Add the clutch & brake levers and controls on the handlebars
  • Mount the motor and exhaust/ muffler
  • Wire the bike up (ignition, coil, battery, lights, horn, speedo)
  • Cut the new chain
  • Adjust the carb
  • Make sure the oil pump works
  • Some other minor things I can't think of...
...and we're good to go.

Here are links to all the "Pieces-of-the-Pie" posts, to see the progress from Day-1.

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